“The movements at this end have not yet resulted in anything more than a little skirmishing”

So far we have been unable to extend our lines beyond the enemy’s right.  I sent an update to Gen. Butler and requested a status report from him.

CLEMENTS’ HOUSE, October 27, 1864-9 a.m.

Major-General BUTLER,

Aiken’s House:

The movements at this end have not yet resulted in anything more than a little skirmishing and forcing the enemy back toward their lines. The Second Corps and the cavalry have forced the crossing of Hatcher’s Run, and are moving west. The Ninth Corps confront the enemy in their works north of Hatcher’s Run. The Fifth Corps is moving between the Second and Ninth Corps. How are you progressing on the right?

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

He replied,

Darbytown, October 27, 1864.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

We have driven in the pickets of the enemy, by Terry, as far as Charles City road. Weitzel has reached, at 1.40 p.m., the exterior lines on the Williamsburg road, and finds Field’s division in his front. He is going to the right as far as Yorktown [York River] railroad to see where the enemy’s right rests. Field’s right rested this morning near the Darbytown road. He has extended, therefore, four miles. Shall I make a trial on this outstretched line? Casualties few as yet.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 354-5

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 390

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