“General Meade moved out from his left this morning and must soon encounter the enemy”

So far, I have had no word of fighting on Gen. Meade’s front.  I wrote Gen. Halleck,

CITY POINT, VA., September 30, 1864-10.30 a. m.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.:

I have heard no firing yet this morning. Before daylight I went up to Deep Bottom and found all quiet there. General Meade moved out from his left this morning and must soon encounter the enemy.  Rosser’s brigade of cavalry has gone to join Early. The brigade numbers about 1,400 horses. Yesterday an infantry force left Petersburg in the Lynchburg cars. It may be, however, they are going via Burkeville to Richmond. Nothing heard from Sheridan through southern sources since Tuesday evening.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 242

O.R., I, xlii, part 2, p 1117

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