Meade: “I should judge from Hancock’s dispatches that he does not consider himself in sufficient force to effect much”

I received the following from Gen. Meade.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 27, 1864-9 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I should judge from Hancock’s dispatches that he does not consider himself in sufficient force to effect much. Can you not re-enforce him from some of Major-General Butler’s troops? I make this suggestion because the stronger he is the more powerful the blow he can strike to-morrow.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

I replied,

CITY POINT, VA., July 27, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding, &c.:

General Butler’s sending off the Nineteenth Corps leaves him very weak, so that I do not think he can re-enforce Hancock much. I will direct him, however, to send all the troops he can possibly spare. General Foster now has about 2,700 men at Deep Bottom, just in position to strike the enemy in flank if he is driven back.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 11, p 328

O.R., I, xl, part 3, p 504

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