“I never asked for any position or any rank, but entered with my whole soul in the cause of the Union”

May 25 1862, Wrote Rev. John H. Vincent, “Your letter of the 17th inst. is just at hand and I hasten to answer.  Since we last met, and since I had the pleasure of listening to your feeling discourses from the pulpit, much has transpired to make and unmake men.  I felt that any who would say that this free and prosperous country of ours should be two, were traitors, deserving of instant punishment, and having been educated a soldier at the expense of the nation, it was my clear duty to offer my services.  I never asked for any position or any rank, but entered with my whole soul in the cause of the Union, willing to sacrifice every thing in the cause, even my life if needs be, for its preservation.  It has been my good fortune to render some service to the cause and my very  bad luck to have attracted the attention of newspaper scribblers.  It certainly never was my desire to attract public attention but has been my desire to do my whole duty in this just cause.

“I was truly rejoiced at receiving a letter from you and hope it will not be the last.  If you should make your expected trip to Palestine, it would afford me the greatest pleasure to hear from you from that far off land and to reply punctually to your letters.

“Although in general robust health I now write from a sick bed.  For several days I have been quite unwell and very much fear a spell of sickness.

“The papers keep you advised of our position, therefore it is not necessary for me to say anything on that subject.  Two large armies however are menacing each other and it cannot be long before they come together.

“Remember me to Mrs. Vincent.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 132-3

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