“Congratulate the President for me for the double victory”

From the news reports coming in, President Lincoln has been re-elected.  No greater blow could have been struck against the Confederate’s hopes.  I wrote to Sec. Stanton,

CITY POINT, November 10, 1864-10.30 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

Enough now seems to be known to say who is to hold the reins of Government for the next four years. Congratulate the President for me for the double victory. The election having passed of quietly, no bloodshed or riot throughout the land, is a victory worth more to the country than a battle won. Rebeldom and Europe will so construe it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 398

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 581

 

“I would rather you would spend Christmas Holidays with me however and bring all the children”

I wrote Julia,

City Point, Va, Nov. 9th 1864. Dear Julia,
I wrote to Mr. Morris telling him that I expected to be in Burlington next Sunday to spend the day. At that time I expected to go to Washington, where all my records are kept, to remain a few days to write my report for Congress. The campaign not being ended I asked the Sec. of War to let me off and he has consented. I will not therefore be home at the time designated.
I have received but one letter from you since you left N. J. Did you meet Gen. Rawlins in St. Louis? He was to have gone out to see you and as he returned about the time your letter announced you would I supposed you would come in company with him.
The election has passed off quietly, I understand, and I hope the choice of the people will be quietly submitted to. If there was less clamor and dissenting in the North the rebellion would be much sooner put down. The hopes of the South are constantly fed by the sayings of our Northern people.
Love and kisses for you & the children. Gen. Rawlins expects to stay about four days in New York City and then return here. If you wish to come and spend a week at that time do so. Bring Jess with you if you come. I would rather you would spend Christmas Holidays with me however and bring all the children. Love and kisses again.
Ulys.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 397-8

“The following official statement of the vote polled in the Army of the Potomac yesterday has just been received”

I have received the official returns for the Presidential election from the men in the Army of the Potomac.  There is a substantial majority for President Lincoln. I sent them to Sec. Stanton.

CITY POINT, November 9, 1864.

Honorable R. M. STANTON:

The following official statement of the vote polled in the Army of the Potomac yesterday has just been received from General Meade: Maine, total vote, 1,677; Lincoln’s majority, 1,143. New Hampshire, 515; Lincoln majority, 279. Vermont, 102; Lincoln’s majority, 42. Rhode Island, 190; Lincoln’s majority, 134. Pennsylvania (seven counties to hear from), 11,122; Lincoln’s majority, 3,494. West Virginia, 82; Lincoln’s majority, 70. Ohio, 684; Lincoln’s majority 306. Wisconsin, 1,065; Lincoln’s majority, 633. Michigan, 1,917; Lincoln’s majority, 745. Maryland, 1,428; Lincoln’s majority, 89. New York, 305; Lincoln’s majority,113.

Majority for Lincoln, 8,208.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 395-6

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 570

“Great good fortune attend you”

I received the following dispatch from Gen. Sherman,

KINGSTON, GA., November 7, 1864-6 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

By the 10th the election will be over, the troops all paid, and all our surplus property will be back to Chattanooga. On that day, or the following, if affairs should remain as now in Tennessee, I propose to begin the movement which I have hitherto fully described. I can hear of no large force to our front, and, according to Thomas, Hood remains about Tuscumbia, and he feels perfectly confident of his ability to take care of him. You can safely communicate with me for the next three days.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

I replied,

CITY POINT, VA., November 7, 1864-10. 30 p. m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Your dispatch of this evening received. I see no present reason for changing your plan; should any arise you will see it; or if I do, will inform you. I think everything here favorable now. Great good fortune attend you. I believe you will be eminently successful, and at worst can only make a march less fruitful of results than is hoped for.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 394

O.R., I, xxxix, part 3, p 679

“Stubborn fighting was kept up from that time until near daylight”

Last night the enemy made an advance on the troops of Second Corps on our left flank.  I wrote Gen. Halleck,

CITY POINT, VA., November 6, 1864-2 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Chief of Staff:

Last night a little after 11 o’clock, the enemy attacked the picket line in front of Gibbon’s and Mott’s divisions, of Second Corps, and, carried about forty of the pits occupied by pickets. Stubborn fighting was kept up from that time until near daylight, resulting in the enemy being driven to their own lines with considerable slaughter. Besides the dead and wounded carried back by the enemy, quite a number are still left in the picket trenches and vicinity. Forty-two prisoners were also captured and some entrenching tools. General Gibbon’s loss is estimated at fifteen or twenty captured. General Mott says his loss will be small, but does not yet give numbers.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 385

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 528

“In view of the fact that the elections are to be held in the armies on Tuesday next, the enemy may make an attack”

The presidential election is coming up on Nov. 8, and soldiers in this army will be casting their vote on that day.  I wrote Gen. Meade,

CITY POINT, November 5, 1864.

General MEADE:

In view of the fact that the elections are to be held in the armies on Tuesday next, the enemy may make an attack, expecting to find us unprepared, and to prevent as far as possible the holding of elections. Every precaution should be taken to have all troops so in hand that they can be used if required.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 382

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 517

“I say, then, go as you propose.”

I received the following from Gen. Sherman,

In the Field, Rome, Ga., November 2, 1864.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point, Va.:

Your dispatch is received. If I could hope to overhaul Hood I would turn against him with my whole force. Then he retreats to the southwest, drawing me as a decoy from Georgia, which is his chief object. If he ventures north of the Tennessee I may turn in that direction and endeavor to get between him and his line of retreat, but thus far he has not gone above the Tennessee. Thomas will have a force strong enough to prevent his reaching any country in which we have an interest, and he has orders if Hood turns to follow me to push for Selma. No single army can catch him, and I am convinced the best results will result from defeating Jeff. Davis’ cherished plan of making me leave Georgia by maneuvering. Thus far I have confined my efforts to thwart his plans, and reduced my baggage so that I can pick up and start in any direction, but I would regard a pursuit of Hood as useless; still if he attempts to invade Middle Tennessee I will hold Decatur and be prepared to move in that direction, but unless I let go Atlanta my force will not be equal to his.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

 

I am reluctant to leave Hood unmolested in North Georgia, but I am forced to agree with Sherman.  Hopefully, Gen. Thomas will have sufficient force to stop Hood.  I wrote,

CITY POINT, VA., November 2, 1864-11. 30 a. m.

Major-General SHERMANS,

Rome, Ga.:

Your dispatch of 9 a. m. yesterday is just received. I dispatched you the same date, advising that Hood’s army, now that it had worked so far north, be looked upon more as the objective. With the force, however, you have left with Thomas, he must be able to take care of Hood and destroy him. I do not really see that you can withdraw from where you are to follow Hood, without giving up all we have gained in territory. I say, then, go as you propose.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 371-3

O.R., I, xxxix, part 3, p 594-5

“If you can see the chance for destroying Hood’s army, attend to that first and make your other move secondary.”

I received the following from Gen. Sherman

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding Armies of the United States, City Point, Va.:

As you foresaw, and as Jeff. Davis threatened, the enemy is now in the full tide of execution of his grand plan to destroy my communications and defeat this army. His infantry, about 30,000, with Wheeler’s and Roddey’s cavalry, from 7,000 to 10,000, are now in the neighborhood of Tusumbia and Florence, and the water being low is able to cross at will. Forrest seems to be scattered from Eastport to Jackson, Paris. and the lower Tennessee, and General Thomas reports the capture by him of a gun-boat and five transport. General Thomas has near Athens and Pulaski Stanley’s corps, about 15,000 strong, and Schofield’s corps, 10,000, en route by rail, and has at least 20,000 to 25,000 men, with new regiments and conscripts arriving all the time; also Rosecrans promises the two DIVISIONS of Smith and Mower, belonging to me, but I doubt if they can reach Tennessee in less than ten days. If I were to let go Atlanta and Northern Georgia and make for Hood, he would, as he did here, retreat to the southwest, leaving his militia, now assembling at Macon and Griffin, to occupy our conquests, and the work of last summer would be lost.

I have retained about 50,000 good troops, and have sent back full 25,000, and having instructed General Thomas to hold defensively Nashville, Chattanooga, and Decatur, all strongly fortified and provisioned for a long siege, I will destroy all the railroads of Georgia and do as much substantial damage as is possible, reaching the sea-coast near one of the points hitherto indicated, trusting that General Thomas, with his present troops and the influx of new troops promised, will be able in a very few days to assume the offensive. Hood’s cavalry may do a good deal of damage, and I have sent Wilson back with all dismounted cavalry, retaining only about 4,500.

This is the best I am do, and shall, therefore, when I can get to Atlanta the necessary stores, move as soon as possible.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

 

I replied,

Major-General SHERMAN,

Atlanta, Ga.:

Do you not think it advisable now that Hood has gone so far north to entirely settle him before starting on your proposed campaign? With Hood’s army destroyed you can go where you please with impunity. I believed, and still believe, that if you had started south whilst Hood was in the neighborhood of you he would have been forced to go after you. Now that he is so far away, he might look upon the chase as useless and go in one direction whilst you are pushing in the other. If you can see the chance for destroying Hood’s army, attend to that first and make your other move secondary.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 370-1

O.R., I, xxxix, part 3, p 576-