“Nothing was left, therefore, but to assume the command myself.”

Jan 18 1863. ” On the 17th I visited McClernand and his command at Napoleon. It was here made evident to me that both the army and navy were so distrustful of McClernand’s fitness to command that, while they would do all they could to insure success, this distrust was an element of weakness. It would have been criminal to send troops under these circumstances into such danger. By this time I had received authority to relieve McClernand, or to assign any person else to the command of the river expedition, or to assume command in person. I felt great embarrassment about McClernand. He was the senior major-general after myself within the department. It would not do, with his rank and ambition, to assign a junior over him. Nothing was left, therefore, but to assume the command myself. I would have been glad to put Sherman in command, to give him an opportunity to accomplish what he had failed in the December before; but there seemed no other way out of the difficulty, for he was junior to McClernand. Sherman’s failure needs no apology.”

The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S Grant, Chpt. XXXI, p 294

“McClernand’s command is at this place; will move down the river to-day”

Jan 18 1863.  I have arrived at Napoleon Ark., and I am ready to begin the expedition to Vicksburg.  I sent a telegram to Gen. Halleck,

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

McClernand’s command is at this place; will move down the river to-day. Should Banks pass Port Hudson this force will be ready to cooperate on Vicksburg at any time. What may be necessary to reduce the place I do not yet know, but since the late rains think our troops must get below the city to be used effectively.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 231

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 573

“My design is to get such information from them as I find impossible to get here.”

Jan 16 1863.  I notified Gen. Halleck that I am going to Napoleon, Arkansas to visit Gen. McClernand’s command to ascertain his fitness to lead the expedition to Vicksburg.

MEMPHIS, TENN., January 1[6], 1863-4.30 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I start immediately to the fleet. My design is to get such information from them as I find impossible to get here. I will return here in a few days, and in the mean time re-enforcements will be forwarded with all dispatch.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 227-8

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 570

“I will send McArthur’s division (all I have transports for) immediately join the expedition on Vicksburg”

Jan 15 1862.  I have arrived in Memphis and have sent a telegram to Gen. Halleck to inform him and to ask for reinforcements to be sent for the advance on Vicksburg.

MEMPHIS, TENN., January 15, 1863-2.30 a. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I will send McArthur’s division (all I have transports for) immediately join the expedition on Vicksburg; send Logan’s in a few days, and hold Quinby ready to embark when called for; abandon the railroad road north from Jackson at once, and move the machine-shop and public stores from that place here, and hold at the troops from Grand Junction around the railroad to Corinth in readiness to be placed on the line from here east. I will go down and take McPherson, leaving Hamilton to command and carry out instructions for those changes in the old District of West Tennessee.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 226

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 564

“It is my present intention to command the expedition down the river in person”

Jan 14 1863.  I sent the following telegram to Gen. McPherson in LaGrange,

MEMPHIS, TENN., January 13, 1863.

Major General J. B. McPHERSON, La Grange, Tenn.:

It is my present intention to command the expedition down the river in person. I will take two divisions with me, Logan’s and McArthur’s I think. It will not be necessary for Logan to move, however, until further orders. I do not know where McClernand is, but have sent orders for him to proceed to Miliken’s Bend and remain there or cooperate with Banks, should he coming up the river.

Was Holly Springs destroyed? Report here says so.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 220

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 558

Gen. Halleck: “You are hereby authorized to relieve General McClernand from command of the-expedition against Vicksburg”

Jan 13 1863.  I have received the following telegram from Gen. Halleck in Washington,

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, January 12, 1863.

Major-General GRANT, Memphis, Tenn.:

You are hereby authorized to relieve General McClernand from command of the-expedition against Vicksburg, giving it to the next in rank or taking it yourself.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

 

I wrote Gen. McClernand,

MEMPHIS, TENN., January 13, 1863.

Major General JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Commanding Expedition on Vicksburg:

On the 11th instant I wrote to you disapproving of the diversion your expedition from the main object, but owing to the difficult of getting a convoy the dispatch has not yet got off. I am in receipt of yours of same date and have forwarded it to Washington. I cannot tell positively what is best for you to do; but unless there is some object not visible at this distance your forces should return to Milliken’s Bend, or some point convenient for operating on Vicksburg, and were they can co-operate with Banks should he come up the river. Banks was in New Orleans on the 16th December, and under orders to push up the river with all possible dispatch. What difficulties he may have had to encounter below I do not know, but understand that Port Hudson has been made very strong. Should he get past that place, however, it is our duty to be prepared to co-operate.

One brigade assigned to the division of Morgan L. Smith goes down to join at the same time with this. I understand also that there are still other forces down the river with the destination, but of this I am not officially informed. I will still further re-enforce with two divisions from here unless the next few days prove it to be unnecessary.

The transports in the river available for moving troops are becoming very limited i consequence of the great number now with you. You will therefore discharge any that are not absolutely necessary for your purposes and order them to report here without delay.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 210, 218-9

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 555, 559

“General McClernand has fallen back to White River, and gone on a wild-goose chase to the Post of Arkansas”

Jan 11 1863.  Gen. McClernand has taken his troops earmarked for Vicksburg and has taken them into Arkansas.  McClernand is a friend of the President and must be handled carefully, but his actions have endangered our advance.  I sent a telegram to Gen. Halleck,

MEMPHIS, TENN., January 11, 1863-3.30 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

General McClernand has fallen back to White River, and gone on a wild-goose chase to the Post of Arkansas. I am ready to ready to re-enforce, but must await further information before knowing what to do.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General, Commanding.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 209

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 553

“I will start for Memphis immediately, and will do everything possible for the capture of Vicksburg.”

Jan 10 1863.  I am personally taking command of the expedition to Vicksburg.  I sent a telegram to Gen. Halleck,

LA GRANGE, TENN., January 9, 1863-1 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Sherman has returned to Napoleon. His loss was small. Will send you the particulars as soon as learned. I will start for Memphis immediately, and will do everything possible for the capture of Vicksburg.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General, Commanding.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 204

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 603

“the general order from these headquarters expelling Jews from the department is hereby revoked.”

In the face of opposition from Washington, I have no choice but to rescind Gen. Orders 11.

CIRCULAR. HDQRS. 13TH ARMY CORPS, DEPT. OF THE TENN.,

Holly Springs, Miss., January 7, 1863.

By direction of General-in-Chief of the Army, at Washington, the general order from these headquarters expelling Jews from the department is hereby revoked.

By order of Major General U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

 

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 544

Gen. Halleck: “Richmond papers of the 5th and 6th say that Sherman has been defeated and repulsed from Vicksburg”

Jan 8 1863.  I received a telegram from Gen. Halleck.  The southern newspapers are reporting that Gen. Sherman has been repulsed at Vicksburg.

Washington, January 7, 1863.

Major-General GRANT, Holly Springs, Miss.:

Richmond papers of the 5th and 6th say that Sherman has been defeated and repulsed from Vicksburg. Every possible effort must be made to re-enforce him. We cannot communicate with Banks, but he has been urged to lose no time in co-operating. Curtis has been directed to give you all he can spare. Take everything you can dispense with in Tennessee and Mississippi. We must not fail in this if within human power to accomplish it.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

 

I replied,

HOLLY SPRINGS, MISS., January 8, 1863- 9.35 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Scouts just into Corinth from south and east report enemy moving east from Jackson and north on Mobile road, fortifying near Meridian. Have been moving several days. This is not confirmatory of Richmond report. Some of Bragg’s forces are passing south of line of Athens and Nashville road.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 197

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 542, 544