“The Jews … are hereby expelled from the Department within twenty-four hours from the receipt of this order”

Dec 17 1862.  The illegal trade in cotton from the Southern states is becoming intolerable.  It is a great detriment to the prosecution of this war.  As such, I have issued General Order No. 11 calling for the removal of the largest group of people responsible for it.

General Orders No. 11

 

Head Quarters 13th Army Corps,

Department of the Tennessee,

Oxford, Miss. Dec. 17th 1862.
I. The Jews, as a class violating every regulation of trade established by the Treasury Department and also department orders, are hereby expelled from the Department [of the Tennessee] within twenty-four hours from the receipt of this order.
II. Post commanders will see to it that all of this class of people be furnished passes and required to leave, and any one returning after such notification will be arrested and held in confinement until an opportunity occurs of sending them out as prisoners, unless furnished with permit from headquarters.
III. No passes will be given these people to visit headquarters for the purpose of making personal application of trade permits.
By Order of Maj. Genl. U.S.G.

Jno. A. Rawlins

Ass’t Adj’t Genl.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Vol 7, p 47

National Archives, RG 94, Dept. of the Tenn., General Orders

“General Order No. 11”, Wikipedia

Gen Dodge: “Johnston has entire command and they intend to make a stand at Torgue”

Dec 16 1862.  I have received more intelligence on the enemy’s position.  Bragg and Johnston are preparing for an attack while Forrest’s cavalry might be preparing to raid behind our lines.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.

OXFORD, MISS., December 16, 1862-6 p.m.

The following dispatch from General Dodge just received:

CORINTH, MISS., December 16, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

I have men in direct from Shelbyville, Tenn., left the 8th and crossed the Tennessee at Eastport. All the army at Shelbyville and south had been ordered to Torgue [Lavergne], Tenn., also most of cavalry. The bulk of the stores were kept at Chattanooga, they having eight days’ on hand. Johnston has entire command and they intend to make a stand at Torgue. The bridge at Bridgeport is finished. A large number of deserters are coming to our lines from Bragg’s army-West Tennessee and Arkansas troops. They corroborate the above generally. When these men left, most of Forrest’s cavalry was up on Cumberland River, west of Nashville. Buckner’s command occupied Shelbyville and marched to Torgue December 6. Colonel Warren was killed in fight in Tuscumbia.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

U. S. GRANT.

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Vol 7, p 46

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 476

“I am pushing down on them slowly, but so as to keep up the impression of a continuous move”

Dec 14 1862.  I wrote Gen. Sherman,

OXFORD, MISS., December 14, 1862.

Major General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN:

I have not had one word from Grierson since he left, and am getting uneasy about him. I hope General Gorman will give you no difficulty about returning the troops that were on this side of the river,and Steele to command them. The 21,000 men you have, with 12,000 from Helena, will make a good force. The enemy are as yet on the Yalabusha. I am pushing down on them slowly, but so as to keep up the impression of a continuous move. I feel particularly anxious to have the Helena on this side of the river, if not now, at least after you start. If Gorman will send them, instruct them where to go and how to communicate with me. My headquarters will probably be in Coffeeville one week hence; in the mean time I will be at Spring Dale. It would be well if you could have two or three small boats suitable for navigating the Yazoo. It may become necessary for me to look to that base for supplies before we get through.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General

The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Vol 7, p 33-4

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 412

“I want you to strike the Mobile road as far south as possible”

Dec. 13 1862.  I have ordered Col. Dickey on a raid to the south to disrupt enemy communications.

Colonel T. LYLE DICKEY,

Commanding Cavalry Division;

I want you to strike the Mobile road as far south as possible and follow up north, destroying it all you can. Particular roads to pass over cannot be given. You may encounter difficulties that will defeat the object of the expedition. I do not want any great risk run, but leave this entirely to your judgment.

Dodge starts a force of probably 2,500 men from Corinth southward to-day, intended to co-operate with you. If practicable you might continue north until you meet them and return by Pontotoc to the front.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 20

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 410

“A fund may be created at each post to supply the necessaries of destitute families gratis.”

Dec 12 1862.  Having two large armies fighting in the area for most of the year has created widespread hardship in the area.  I have ordered the troops to do what they can to alleviate it.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,
HDQRS. ARMY IN THE FIELD,
Numbers 21.
Oxford, Miss., December 12, 1862.

I. Distress and almost famine having been brought on many of the inhabitants of Mississippi by the march of the two armies through the land, and humanity dictating that in a land of plenty no one should suffer the pangs of hunger, the general commanding directs that the following provision shall be made at all military posts within this State:

II. At each post one or more loyal persons will be authorized to keep for sale provisions and absolute necessaries for family use. Nothing will be sold except on permits granted by the commanding officers of posts, and no permits will be granted for a greater amount of any one article than the commander may believe is necessary for the family of the purchaser.

III. A fund may be created at each post to supply the necessaries of destitute families gratis, either by laying contributions upon those disloyal persons who are able to pay, taking cotton brought to their posts, for sale, or in any other equitable way.

IV. All contributions so selected will be expended by the accounts will be kept separate from all other accounts.

V. The commanding officers of posts will require all accounts of these disbursements to be presented for their examination weekly, and they will be held responsible that these accounts are properly kept.

VI. All such accounts will be open for inspection to the inspector-general of the departmental any time he may call for them.

* * * * * * *

By order of Major General U. S. Grant;

[JNO. A. RAWLINS,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 18-19

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 405

“Cavalry will leave Springdale on Saturday to strike Mobile road.”

Dec. 11 1862.  Our advance towards Vicksburg continues.  We are approaching Tupelo.  I sent the following orders to Gen. Dodge in Corinth.

OXFORD, MISS., December 11, 1862.

Brigadier General GRENVILLE M. DODGE, Corinth, Miss.:

Cavalry will leave Springdale on Saturday to strike Mobile road. Send out a force from Corinth to co-operate, allowing them to go as far south as Tupelo if practicable. Keep a sharp lookout for Bragg’s forces. Should he approach Corinth I will re-enforce you sufficiently. You have a much more important command than that of a division in the field.

It would probably be well send toward Iuka at the same time you send south.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 14-15

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 399

Gen. Dodge: “Kirby Smith is at Murfreesborough, Breckinridge at Shelbyville, Bragg a short distance from Tullahoma.”

Dec 10 1862 I have received intelligence of the position of the Rebel army in East Tennessee.  I passed it on to Gen. Halleck.

Major-General HALLECK.

OXFORD, MISS., December 10, 1862-12 noon.

Following dispatch just received from Corinth, Miss., December 10, 1862:

Major General U. S. GRANT:

The news from Bragg is that Kirby Smith is at Murfreesborough, Breckinridge at Shelbyville, Bragg a short distance from Tullahoma. The railroad is finished from Athens to Tennessee River, thence to Huntsville. This may account for the accelerating accumulation of forage on railroad which runs from Florence to that railroad. I have seen several men from Bragg’s army with twenty days’ furlough. They say Bragg intends to stay where he is. Provisions getting very scarce is Tennessee Valley and north of it.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

U. S. GRANT.

Major-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 9-10

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 475

“Instructions from Washington are to encourage getting Cotton out of the country.”

Cotton speculators from the North are becoming more and more numerous.  Providing economic aid to the enemy by buying their cotton is counter-productive to the war effort, but I have orders from Washington to allow it.  Still, I can insist that the rules laid out by Washington are followed.  Col. DuBois in Holly Springs has issued the following order,

On account of the scarcity of provisions, all Cotton-Speculators, Jews and other Vagrants having no honest means of support, except trading upon the miseries of their Country, and in general all persons from the North, not connected with the Army, who have no permission from the General Commanding to remain in town, Will leave in twenty four hours or they will be sent to duty in the trenches.

I wrote to him,

Col. J.V. DuBois

Holly Springs, Miss.

Permission has been granted for Cotton speculators and Citizens of the North generally to come South as far as the Tallahatchie.  Instructions from Washington are to encourage getting Cotton out of the country.  Department orders have been published regulating this matter and any violation of them can be punished by sending the offender out of the Dept.  Any order you have published different from this contravenes Dept. orders and will have to be rescinded.

U. S. Grant

Maj Genl

 

The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Vol 7, p 8-9

National Archives, RG 393, Dept. of the Tenn., Letters Sent

 

“The enterprise would be much safer in charge of the latter.”

Dec 9 1862.  Sherman has started his expedition down the river to Vicksburg.  I have also received a report that Gen. McClernand is planning to start his own expedition towards Vicksburg.  I wrote Gen. Halleck to ensure that Sherman maintains command.

OXFORD, MISS., December 9, 1862-5 p.m.

The number of prisoners taken on the advance here proves over 1,200. Besides these, many deserters come in daily to take the oath of allegiance and return home to the border States. I have permitted in arms, to take the oath and go home. A letter from General McClernand, just received, states that he expects to go forward in a few days. Sherman has already gone. The enterprise would be much safer in charge of the latter.

U. S. GRANT.

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 7, p 6

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 475

“As soon as possible move with them down the river to the vicinity of Vicksburg”

Dec. 8 1862.  Gen. Halleck has approved the troops I need to advance on Vicksburg.  I have ordered Gen. Sherman to take command of the expedition.

HEADQUARTERS THIRTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Oxford, Miss., December 8, 1862.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Right Wing:

You will proceed with as little delay as possible to Memphis, Tenn., taking with you one division of your present command. On your arrival at Memphis you will assume command of all the troops there, and that portion of General Curtis’ forces at present east of the Mississippi River, and organize them into brigades and divisions in your own way. As soon as possible move with them down the river to the vicinity of Vicksburg, and with the co-operation of the gunboat fleet under command of Flag-Officer Porter proceed to the reduction of that place, in such manner as circumstances as your own judgment may dictate. The amount of rations, forage, land transportation, &c., necessary to take will be left entire with yourself.

The quartermasters at Saint Louis will be instructed to send you transportation for 30,000 men. Should you still find yourself deficient, your quartermaster will be authorized to make up the deficiency from such transports as may come into the port of Memphis.

On arriving in Memphis put yourself in communication with Admiral Foote and arrange with him for his co-operation. Inform me at the earliest practicable day of the time when you will embark and such planks as may then be natured. I will hold the forces here in readiness to co-operate with you in such manner as the movements of the enemy may make necessary.

Leave the District of Memphis in the command of an efficient officer, and with a garrison of four regiment of infantry, the siege guns, and whatever cavalry may be there.

U, S, GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 406-7

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 601