“We have Falkner, 3 of his officer, and 12 men. How shall they be treated?”

Oct 19 1862.  I received the following report from Gen. Dodge of a skirmish at Island 10, in the Mississippi River near New Madrid Mo.

Report of Brigadier General Grenville M. Dodge, U. S. Army.

COLUMBUS, October 18, 1862

 

SIR: Colonel Faulkner, [Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry.], and 300 rebel cavalry attacked Island 10 yesterday at daylight.

Our forces whipped the enemy, taking Colonel Faulkner, Captain R. M. Meriwether, Captain H. B. Blakemore, Adjt. L. H. Johnson, and 12 enlisted men prisoners. The enemy’s loss in killed and wounded is severe; our loss 3 killed.

 

Major McNeil with re-enforcements from New Madrid had crossed Reelfoot Lake, below the Obion, and thinks he will cut off their retreat.

 

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

 

There is some question as to how to treat the captured Rebels.  Are they prisoners of war or guerrilla outlaws?  I wrote to Gen. Halleck for clarification.

JACKSON, TENN., October 19, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

 

We have Falkner, 3 of his officer, and 12 men. How shall they be treated? They claim to be regulars in the army and entitled to exchange. I think the officers at least should be held.

 

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 157-8

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 460

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 281

“Another attack is soon inevitable.”

Oct 17 1862.  I received the following telegram from Gen. Halleck,

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 17, 1862.

Major General U. S. GRANT, Jackson, Tenn.:

 

What is the condition of affairs in your department? Am anxious to know, as Governor Johnson and General Curtis are asking for more troops.

 

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

 

I responded,

JACKSON, TENN., October 17, 1862-8.15 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

 

My effective force is 48,500 exclusive of extra-duty men, located as follows: Four thousand eight hundred in Kentucky and Illinois, 7,000 in Memphis, 19,200 from Union City south, besides Corinth forces-latter 17,500. Another attack is soon inevitable. Re-enforcements necessary to keep up the confidence of our men as well as to give sufficient strength to meet the enemy. The enemy are largely re-enforced.

 

U. S. GRANT.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 155-6

O.R., I, xvii, part 2, p 279

It does look to me that we now have such an advantage over the rebels that there should be but little more hard fighting

Oct 16 1862.  I responded to a letter to me from my sister Mary,

Dear Sister,

 

I received your letter by due course of mail and expected before this to have answered one of your questions in the shape of an official report.  That is the part where you ask me the part I played at the battle of Iuka.  When the reports of subalterns come in I will make my report which no doubt will be published and will be a full answer to your question.  I had no more to do with troops under Gen. Ord than I had with those under Rosecrans but gave the orders to both.  The plan was admirably laid for catching Price and his whole Army but owing to the nature of the ground, direction of the wind and Gen. Rosecrans having been so far behind where he was expected to be on the morning before the attack, it failed.  In the late battles we have gained such a moral advantage over them, however with Van Dorn and Lovell added that I do not know but it may have all been for the better.

 

I have written to Julia to come down here and spend a short time.  It will probably be  but a short time that she can stay but so long as I remain here this will be a pleasant place for her.  If the children have not already been sent to Covington I told her to bring them with her.  The last letter I received she said that she was about sending them to Covington.

I believe you have now got it all quiet on the Ohio!  I hope it will soon be so every place else.  It does look to me that we now have such an advantage over the rebels that there should be but little more hard fighting.

 

Give my love to all at home.  Write often and without expecting either very prompt or very long replies.

 

Ulys.

Rosenbach Foundation, Philadelphia PA

“If practicable send troops … to occupy Caseyville for a few days and drive out the rebels.”

Oct 15 1862.  Brig. Gen. Grenville Dodge has sent word that Guerrillas operating out of Caseyville Ky, on the Mississippi River along the Kentucky-Missouri border, have been harassing our steamboats.  I sent him the following order

If practicable send troops from Columbus and Paducah to occupy Caseyville for a few days and drive out the rebels.  Inform yourself well however of their probable strength before going.  Caseyville not being in this military District, it is not desirable that troops sent there should remain more than a few days.

U. S. Grant

Maj. Genl.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 151

National Archives, RG 393, Dept of the Mo., Telegrams Received

“We will see from his move what to do ourselves and will give him a tremendous thrashing some place.”

Oct 14 1862.  I received the following report from Gen. Rosecrans of a rumor that Rebel Gen. Joseph Johnston has brought reinforcements to face us.

ROSECRANS’ HEADQUARTERS,

October 13, 1862.

Major-General GRANT, Jackson:

General McPherson arrived last night. No signs of an enemy. Pushed cavalry 17 miles on the Oxford road; nothing but stragglers. Enemy have gone to Oxford, except a few regiments to Tupelo. A rumor is gaining currency among the secesh that Johnston, with 40,000 men from Virginia, has arrived at Oxford. It must receive prompt attention. Pocahontas is a key which ought to be occupied in case the rebels dispose a portion of their Virginia forces to push in here. It would be a strong move. Tell Sherman to put spies in motion; I will do the same, to find out all I can.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

I replied,

Head Quarters Dist of West Tenn.

Jackson Tenn. Oct. 13 1862

Maj. Genl. Rosecrans,

We must ascertain if Johnston is in our front and if so it will become necessary to abandon Corinth and concentrate the whole force at Bolivar.  We will see from his move what to do ourselves and will give him a tremendous thrashing some place.

Substance of your dispatches has been sent to Gen. Sherman.

U. S. Grant

Maj. Genl.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 150

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 276

“I am now promised a large force of new troops.”

Oct 12 1862,  I sent the following telegram to Gen. Rosecrans,

On the return of troops to Corinth, send Lawler and his tow Regts. and Stevens and his two regiments back here to join their old brigades.

The 1st Kansas may be retained — attaching it to the weakest Brigade in McKean’s Division.  I am now promised a large force of new troops.  They will mostly go to Memphis.

U.S. Grant

Maj. Genl.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 149

National Archives, RG 393, Army of the Miss., Telegrams Received

“Their loss in killed about nine to one of ours.”

Oct 10 1862.  I responded to the telegram from President Lincoln,

JACKSON, TENN., October 9, 1862.

Your dispatch received. Cannot answer it so fully as I would wish. Paroled now 813 enlisted men and 43 commissioned officers in good health; 700 Confederate wounded already sent to Iuka paroled; 350 wounded paroled still at Corinth. Cannot tell the number of dead yet. About 800 rebels already buried. Their loss in killed about nine to one of ours. The ground is not yet clear of their unburied dead. Prisoners yet arriving by every road and train. This does not include casualties where Ord attacked in the rear. He has 350 well prisoners, besides two batteries and small-arms in large numbers. Our loss there was between 400 and 500. Rebel loss about the same. General Oglesby is shot through the breast and the ball lodged in the spine. Hopes for his recovery. Our killed and wounded at Corinth will not exceed 900, many of them slightly.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 143

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, 156-7

President Lincoln: “I congratulate you and all concerned in your recent battles and victories.”

Oct 9 1862.  Yesterday I received the following telegram from President Lincoln,

WASHINGTON, D. C., October 8, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

I congratulate you and all concerned in your recent battles and victories. How does it all sum up? I especially regret the death of General Hackleman, and am very anxious to know the condition of General Oglesby, who is an intimate personal friend.

A. LINCOLN.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 143

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 160

“I have strained every string to get new troops but as yet have got two Regiments.”

In light of my orders from Gen. Halleck, I am making every effort to continue the pursuit of the Rebels.  I sent the following telegram to Gen. Rosecrans,

I have ordered Hurlbut to Grand Junction with orders to repair his R. Road to his rear.  Part of Engineer Regt. goes from here tonight to do the work.

I have strained every string to get new troops but as yet have got two Regiments.

Hold where you are until further orders from me.  With out further reinforcements to hold our rear, it would be folly to push on.  I will make other efforts to get them.

 

U.S. Grant

Maj. Genl.

 

Gen. Rosecrans sent the following two telegrams in response,

Major-General GRANT.

RIPLEY, October 8, 1862-9.45 p. m.

(Via Chewalla, October 9.)

 

I have to report that our advance occupied Ripley last night before 11 o’clock. Enemy formed their line of battle yesterday afternoon, expecting us to attack them, but retired before night. General Hamilton occupied Rienzi, and having received provisions, marched from there to Hatchie Crossing on Ripley road to-day, where he has been ordered to take post at Nolin’s Cross-Roads, covering our communication with Rienzi and Kossuth. The troops will then be: McArthur on the right, Stanley next, McPherson covering the town. Cavalry division has been ordered to recruit, furnishing minimum number of scouts.

 

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

 

 

General GRANT.

RIPLEY, October 8, 1862-9.45 p. m.

 

Your two dispatches received; the last highly gratifying. Dispositions will be made in conformity, and I will remain here. Have ordered telegraph line to be extended to Pocahontas and repaired to Grand Junction. Please order railroad to be repaired to Pocahontas and Grand Junction. You artemis informed as to my having communicated with Sherman, as I have never presumed to do so except so far, after having been informed by you as to his whereabouts, I sent word to Hurlbut wishing him to tell Sherman where we and asking cooperation. I should not think of communicating with him in any official way except through you. Please order a large number of cavalry and artillery horses to be ready; many are now needed. Cavalry has suffered very severely by last week’s labor and for forage.

 

W. S. ROSECRANS.

Major-General GRANT.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 138-9

Rosecrans Papers, UCLA

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 164-5

 

“If you say so, however, it is not too late yet to go on”

Oct 8 1862.  I received a telegram from Gen. Halleck questioning my decision to halt pursuit of the fleeing Rebels.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 8, 1862.

 

Why order a return of our troops? Why not re-enforce Rosecrans and pursue the enemy into Mississippi, supporting your army on the country?

 

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

I replied,

Major-General GRANT, Jackson, Tenn.

 

JACKSON, TENN., October 8, 1862-7.30 p. m.

An army cannot subsist itself on the country except in forage. They did not start out to follow for more than a few days, and are much worn out, and I have information not only that the enemy have reserves that are on their way to join their retreating columns, but they have fortifications to return to in case of need. The Mobile road is also open to the enemy to near Rienzi, and Corinth would be exposed by the advance. Although partial success might result from farther pursuit disaster would follow in the end. If you say so, however, it is not too late yet to go on, and I will join the moving column and go to the farthest extent possible. Rosecrans has been re-enforced with everything at hand, even at the risk of this road against raids.

 

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 6, p 134

O.R., I, xvii, part 1, p 156