This morning I traveled “to La Grange with no convoy but the few cavalry men I had with me.”

June 22 1862, This morning I traveled “to La Grange with no convoy but the few cavalry men I had with me.

“From La Grange to Memphis the distance is forty-seven miles. There were no troops stationed between these two points, except a small force guarding a working party which was engaged in repairing the railroad. Not knowing where this party would be found I halted at La Grange. General Hurlbut was in command there at the time and had his headquarters tents pitched on the lawn of a very commodious country house. The proprietor was at home and, learning of my arrival, he invited General Hurlbut and me to dine with him. I accepted the invitation and spent a very pleasant afternoon with my host, who was a thorough Southern gentleman fully convinced of the justice of secession. After dinner, seated in the capacious porch, he entertained me with a recital of the services he was rendering the cause. He was too old to be in the ranks himself—he must have been quite seventy then—but his means enabled him to be useful in other ways. In ordinary times the homestead where he was now living produced the bread and meat to supply the slaves on his main plantation, in the low-lands of Mississippi. Now he raised food and forage on both places, and thought he would have that year a surplus sufficient to feed three hundred families of poor men who had gone into the war and left their families dependent upon the “patriotism” of those better off. The crops around me looked fine, and I had at the moment an idea that about the time they were ready to be gathered the “Yankee” troops would be in the neighborhood and harvest them for the benefit of those engaged in the suppression of the rebellion instead of its support. I felt, however, the greatest respect for the candor of my host and for his zeal in a cause he thoroughly believed in, though our views were as wide apart as it is possible to conceive.”

The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S Grant, Chpt XXVII, p 258-59

“I shall leave here on the 21st for Memphis where my Head Quarters will be located for the time being”

June 19, 1862 Wrote Congressman Washburne, “Your letter of the 8th inst. addressed to me at Covington Ky. has just reached.  At the time the one was written to which it is an answer, I had leave to go home, or to Covington, but Gen. Halleck requested me to remain for a few days.  Afterwards when I spoke of going he asked that I should remain a little longer if my business was not of pressing importance.  As I really had no business, and had not asked leave on such grounds, I told him so and that if my services were required I would not go at all.  This settled my leave for the present, and for the war; so long as my services are required I do not wish to leave.

“I am exceedingly obliged to you for the interest you have taken in the appointment recommended by me and also for the assurances that the Sec. of War receives them with such favor.  I will endeavor never to make a recommendation unsafe to accede to.

“I shall leave here on the 21st for Memphis where my Head Quarters will be located for the time being.  Fast Western Tennessee is being reduced to working order and I think with the introduction of the Mails, trade, and the assurance that we can hold it, it will become loyal, or at least law abiding.  It will not do however for our arms to meet with any great reverse and still expect this result.  The masses this day are more disloyal in the South, from fear of what might befall them, in case of defeat to the Union cause than from any dislike to the Government.  One week to them (after giving in their adhesion to our laws) would be worse under the so called Confederate Government than a year of Martial Law administered by this army.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 145-6

Illinois State Historical Library

“My command at present embraces all Tennessee west of the Tennessee River and Forts Henry and Donelson east of it”

June 16 1862, Wrote Julia “I hope this will be my last letter but one from this place.  The next will likely inform you of the day I shall leave for Memphis and how you are to join me.  If at all practicable I will go after you and spend a few days at home, if not will provide means and ways for you to join me.

“I have just received your letter enclosing Nellie’s card of merit.  It is very pretty and shows that she is a good girl and learns well at school.  I think after vacation we will have to send Jess back to go to school and see if he cannot get some cards for good behavior.

“That was quite a mistake made in the announcement of my arrival at home.  I wish it could have been true.  It would be a great relief to get away for a few days and if there is no likelihood of active service soon I must try and go.

“This is a dreary and desolated country.  I went North to Jackson on Friday and returned on Saturday and found the country looking much more prosperous however.  Some of my troops are occupying that place, and guard all the road from here there, form there to Grand Junction, and also a portion of the road from Humboldt to Memphis.  You will have to look at the map to see where those places are.

“My command at present embraces all Tennessee west of the Tennessee River and Forts Henry and Donelson east of it and I can choose any point within this District for Head Quarters.  It is proper though that a point within easy communication of all other points and Department Head Quarters should be selected.  Memphis will be connected by rail and telegraph with all, and near Arkansas where, if necessary, a portion of my troops might be required in case of an emergency.

“Give my love to all at home.  Do not write any more after the receipt of his unless you receive directions from me.  I would like to have Mary come with us, or you as the case may be, to spend the vacation of the children.

“Kisses to all and good night.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 145

Wrote Julia, “I hope to be off on Monday for Memphis and if so, want you to join me there.”

June 12 1862, Wrote Julia, “It is bright and early (before the morning mail leaves) and I thought to write you that in a few days, Monday the 16th, I would leave here.  I hope to be off on Monday for Memphis and if so, want you to join me there.  I will write again however just before starting and it may be will have arranged to go after you instead of you coming by yourself.  I would love most dearly to get away from care for a week or two.

“I am very well.  This is apparently an exceedingly fine climate and one to enjoy health in.  Citizens are beginning to return to Corinth and seem to think the Yankees a much less bloody, revengeful and to be dreaded people, than they had been led to think.

“In my mind there is no question but that this war could be ended at once if the whole Southern people could express their unbiased feeling untrammeled by leaders.  The feeling is kept up however by crying out Abolitionist against us and this is unfortunately sustained by the acts of a very few among us.  There have been instances of negro stealing, persons going to the houses of farmers who have remained at home, being inclined to Union sentiments, and before their eyes persuade their blacks to mount up behind them and go off.  Of course, I can trace such conduct to no individual, but believe the guilty parties have never heard the whistle of a single bullet nor intentionally never will.

“Give my love to all at home.  Kisses for yourself and children.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 142-3

Library of Congress – USG

Capt. Kelton: “Major Generals Grant, Buell and Pope will resume the command of their separate army corps”

June 10 1862, Received orders via Capt. Kelton, “The order dividing the army near ‘Corinth’ into right wing, center, left wing and reserve is hereby revoked.  Major Generals Grant, Buell and Pope will resume the command of their separate army corps, except the division of Major General Thomas which will, till further orders, be stationed in Corinth as a part of the Army of the Tennessee.  General Thomas will resume the immediate ocmmand of his former division on its arrival at Corinth and Brig. Gen. T. W. Sherman will report to Major General Buell for duty with the Army of the Ohio.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 143

O.R., I, x, part 2, 288

Wrote Julia, “There was quite a feeling among the troops, at least so expressed by Gen. officers below me, against my going”

June 9, 1862 Wrote Julia, “I expected by this time to be at home, but fate is against it.  You need not now look for me at all, but you may look for a letter soon where to join me.  I do not know where myself, but in all probability it will be in West Tennessee.

“Privately I say to you that when I talked of going home and leaving my command here there was quite a feeling among the troops, at least so expressed by Gen. officers below me, against my going.  I will have to stay.  It is barely possible that I may be able to leave long enough to go after you and bring you on.  If so I will do it.

“It would afford me the greatest pleasure to be relieved from active duty for even a short time.  People in civil life have no idea of the immense labor devolving on a commander in the field.  If they had, they would never envy them.  Rawlins has become so perfectly posted in the duties of the office that I am relieved entirely from the routine.  Cols. Hillyer and Lagow are also familiar with the duties and aid me out of doors materially.

“Although Gen. Sherman has been made a Maj. Gen. by the battle of Shiloh, I have never done half justice by him.  With green troops he was my standby during that trying day of Sunday, (there has been nothing like it on this continent, nor in history.)  He kept his Division in place all day, and aided materially in keeping those to his right and left in place.

“He saw me frequently and received, and obeyed, my directions during the day, but some others, I will say only one other, may have forgotten them.  In writing this last sentence it would leave an inference against a commander on Sunday.  I would imply nothing of the sort, but against one of my commanders on Monday.

“Give my love to all at home.  Kiss the children for me and accept the same for yourself.  Has Jess got his pistol yet?  I sent it by Wm Smith.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 140-1

Library of Congress – USG

Gen Sherman: “I have just received your note, and am rejoiced at your conclusion to remain”

June 6 1862, Received letter from Gen Sherman, “I have just received your note, and am rejoiced at your conclusion to remain. For yourself, you could not be quiet at home for a week, when armies were moving, and rest could not relieve your mind of the gnawing sensation that injustice has been done you.

“There is a power in our land, irresponsible, corrupt and malicious—”the press,” which has created the intense feelings of hostility that has arrayed the two parts of our country against each other which must be curbed and brought within the just limits of reason and law, before we can have peace in America.

“War cannot cease as long as any flippant fool of an editor may stir up the passions of the multitude, arraign with impunity the motives of the most honorable, and howl on their gang of bloody hounds to hunt down any man who despises their order.

“We can deal with armies who have a visible and tangible existence, but it will require tact and skill and courage to clip the wings of this public enemy.  I hope you have sufficiency felt the force of what I say to join in their just punishment before we resign our power and pass into the humble rank of citizens.

“The moment you obtained a just celebrity at Donelson by a stroke of war, more rich in consequences than was the battle of Saratoga, envious rivals and malicious men set their pack of hounds at you, to pull you from the pinnacle which you had richly attained.

“By patience and silence we can quiet their noise and in due time make them feel that in defaming others, they have destroyed themselves.  Already is their power of mischief on the wane and as a soon as a few I could name, drop the dirty minions of a corrupt press, they will drop back into the abyss of infamy they deserve.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 141-2

Personal Memoirs of Gen. W. T. Sherman, I, p 283

Thanks to Gen. Sherman’s Blog