“On the 21st General Pope arrived with an army 30,000 strong”

Apr 22 1862,  “On the 21st General Pope arrived with an army 30,000 strong, fresh from the capture of Island Number Ten in the Mississippi River.  He went in to camp at Hamburg landing, five miles above Pittsburg.  Halleck now had three armies:  the Army of the Ohio, Buell commanding, the Army of the Mississippi, Pope commanding, and the Army of the Tennessee.”

Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S Grant, Chpt. XXVI, p 248

“A Mr. Saunders of this state … reports that the enemy have about 15,000 troops at Bethel.”

Apr 21 1862 Wrote Gen. Halleck, “A Mr. Saunders of this state who has acted as guide for our troops and given all the information he could of the movements of the rebels has just come in and reports that the enemy have about 15,000 troops at Bethel.  They have cut timber between Crumps Landing and Purdy but not on the road from here.  It is said to be the intention of the enemy to take possession of Chalk Bluffs, six miles below Savanna, and interrupt the navigation of the river.

“I give the information for what it is worth not think it unlikely however that some such movement might be made.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 62

National Archives, RG 109, Union Provost Marshals’ File of Papers Relating to Individual Citizens

“You will please hold your command in readiness to move tomorrow morning”

Apr 18 1862, Wrote Gen. Hurlbut, “You will please hold your command in readiness to move tomorrow morning to a position in front of Gen. Wallace’s Division.

“A guide will be sent to indicate the point where you are to encamp.  Immediately on getting your new position, you will have roads and all necessary bridges made to communicate freely with Pittsburgh Landing, and to the front on the main Corinth road.”

Also wrote Gen. McKean, “You will please hold your command in readiness to move tomorrow morning to a position in front of that now occupied by Gen. Wallace, and to the left of Gen. Hurlbut’s new position.  A guide will be sent to point out the ground.  Immediately on taking your new position, parties will be detailed to make roads and bridges to make your access easy to Pittsburgh Landing, and to the main Corinth roads.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 59-60

National Archives, RG 393 USG Letters Sent

“There has been constant firing this morning by soldiers of your Division, in violation of orders.”

Apr 17 1862 Received letter from Capt. McLean, “I am directed by the Major General Commanding to call your attention to the unnecessary discharge of fire arms, which might cause unfounded alarm and endanger the life of our men.  Hereafter, old guards, and all officers and men will draw the charge from their arms instead of discharging them.”

I sent an order to Gen. Hurlbut, “There has been constant firing this morning by soldiers of your Division, in violation of orders.

“Send out and have the Officers permitting it arrested, and the men punished if possible.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 55

National Archives, RG 393, USG Letters Sent

National Archives, RG 393, Dept. of the Miss., Letters Sent

 

Gen. Halleck: “Your army is not now in condition to resist an attack. It must be made so without delay.”

Apr 15 1862 Received orders from Gen. Halleck, “Immediate and active measures must be taken to put your command in condition to resist another attack by the enemy. Fractions of batteries will be united temporarily under competent officers, supplied with ammunition, and placed in position for service. Divisions and brigades should, where necessary, be reorganized and put in position, and all stragglers returned to their companies and regiments. Your army is not now in condition to resist an attack. It must be made so without delay. Staff officers must be sent out to obtain returns from division commanders and assist in supplying all deficiencies.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 48-9

O.R., I, x, part 2, 105-6

Sherman: “They jointly destroyed Bear Creek Bridge and 500 feet of trestle work, that cannot be repaired in a month”

Apr 14 1862 Received report from Gen. Sherman, “I have the honor to report that in obedience to verbal orders from General Grant, ratified in person by General Halleck, I embarked on board the transports Tecumseh and White Cloud, during the evening of the 12th instant, 100 men of the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, under command of Major S. M. Bowman, and the brigade of General Fry, and, escorted by the gunboats Tyler and Lexington, Commanders Gwinn and Shirk, proceeded up the Tennessee River to Chickasaw Landing, where all the troops were disembarked at 7 a. m. the 13th instant.

By my orders Major Bowman proceeded rapidly on the road to Iuka, the enemy’s pickets retreating before him, and destroying themselves by fire a road bridge across Bear Creek, which I had ordered General Fry to destroy, to secure the right flank of the movement on the Bear Creek bridge. This bridge, about 7 miles from Chickasaw, being destroyed, Major Bowman proceeded rapidly up the road 8 miles farther, and on approaching the railroad bridge across Bear Creek he found it guarded by the enemy. He dismounted his men and advanced along the track, with flankers in the swampy ground, and drove the enemy from the bridge into the cut beyond and from that to the west; then, with axes which had been provided, he began the destruction of the trestle work to the east of the bridge, and with fire destroyed the bridge itself. This latter consisted of two spans, of 110 feet each, which were burned and fell into the river. With axes and fire he destroyed three pieces of trestle work of an aggregate length of 500 feet, also tearing down about half a mile of telegraph wire, rolling it up, and throwing it into the river. He gathered ties and other timber, made bonfires, and piled on them the railroad iron, so as to bend it and render it useless for future repairs. While so employed the head of General Fry’s column of infantry arrived and assisted in this work of destruction. They jointly destroyed Bear Creek Bridge and 500 feet of trestle work, that cannot be repaired in a month. Bear Creek is very bad in itself, and the swampy bottom is impassable to wheeled vehicles, so that the breach is vital to the operations of an enemy. Having thus fulfilled well their orders, Major Bowman and General Fry returned to Chickasaw with their commands, reaching the boats about 9 p. m., having marched about 30 miles.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 42-3

O.R., I, x, part 1, 644-5

“I am just instructed by General Halleck to detail two regiments to … cut the bridge over Bear Creek”

Apr 12 1862 Wrote Gen. Sherman, “I am just instructed by General Halleck to detail two regiments to go on board a steamer this evening to proceed up the river to Florence and destroy a portion of the bridge there and return, and, if practicable, cut the bridge over Bear Creek. The two gunboats will accompany. You can select regiments from your command to execute this work.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 41-2

O.R., I, x, part 2, 102

“There is little doubt but that the enemy intend concentrating upon the railroad at and near Corinth”

Apr 9 1862, Wrote Gen. Halleck, “There is little doubt but that the enemy intend concentrating upon the railroad at and near Corinth all the force possible, leaving many points heretofore guarded entirely without troops. I learn this through Southern papers and from a spy who was in Corinth after the rebel army left.

“They have sent steamers up White River to bring down Van Dorn’s and Price’s commands. They are also bringing forces from the East. Prisoners also confirm this information.

“I do not like to suggest, but it appears to me that it would be demoralizing upon our troops here to be forced to retire upon the opposite bank of the river and unsafe to remain on this many weeks without large re-enforcements. The attack on Sunday was made, according to the best evidence I have, by one hundred and sixty-two regiments. Of these many were lost by killed, wounded, and desertion. They are at present very badly crippled, and cannot recover under two or three weeks. Of this matter you may be better able to judge than I am.

“There was one act of the rebels on the battle-field on Sunday which cannot be justified. I have the evidence of officers who say, and could not be deceived, that a brigade dressed in black, and with the Union flag unfurled, passed through an open field in front of one of our batteries, thereby regaining a position that could not otherwise have been attained without loss of life.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 5, p 31-2

O.R., I, x, part 2, p 99-100