“The citizens are very clamorous for Federal protection.”

Dec 29 1861 Wrote Capt. Kelton, “At Cave-in-Rock there are many refugees who have been driven from their homes in Kentucky and are now living in the Cave in very destitute circumstances.

“The country on the Kentucky side has been nearly stripped of all supplies, the Secessionists receiving pay and the Unionists driven from their homes.

“This portion of Ky. is within the Department of the Ohio, but is remote from any of the troops of that Dept.

“The citizens are very clamorous for Federal protection.

“There is an encampment of rebels at Hopkinsville, said to number about 3000 men, poorly armed and equipped, who if driven out would save this portion of the state much annoyance.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 352-4

O.R., I, vii, 523-24

“Justice demands that the class of persons who have caused their sufferings should bear the expense of the same”

Issued General Order No. 26, “Whereas there are now at Cape Girardeau, Paducah & Smithland & Cave in Rock, places within this Military District, many persons who have been driven from their homes and deprived of the means of subsistence by the acts of disloyal citizens of Kentucky and Missouri, and their substance taken, for the support of a rebellion against this Government, humanity dictates that these people should be comfortably supported, and justice demands that the class of persons who have caused their sufferings should bear the expense of the same.

It is ordered therefore, that at the places named, suitable quarters shall be provided and contributions collected for their support and accounted for, in the manner prescribed in General Order No 24 from Head Quarters Dept. of the Missouri, with this addition.

“Persons of Northern birth and education who are liable to assessment under this order, will be taxed fifty per cent more than Southern men of their class of guilt and means.

“The refugees at Cave in Rock will be invited, and means of transportation provided to Smithland or Paducah.

“These contributions will be collected as far out as the Military Arm can securely extend, and at these distant points will be assessed and collected without the intervening of time between assessment and collection.

“Commanding Officers at Paducah, Ky and Cape Girardeau, Mo are particularly charged with the execution of this order.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3, p 349-50

O.R., I, vii, 518-9

 

Wrote Brig. Gen. Buell, “I enclose herewith an order defining the limits of my command”

Dec 27, 1861 Wrote Brig. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, commander of the Army of the Ohio, “I enclose herewith an order defining the limits of my command.  The object is that you may know its extent, and to express to you a desire to cooperate with you as far as practicable, especially in suppressing the smuggling that is now being carried on along the Ohio, to some extent, with the enemy.

I would respectfully request a Copy of such orders as you may have published on the subject.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 345-6

O.R., I, vii, 516-7

“The name of this Military District will be known as the ‘District of Cairo’”

Issued General Orders No. 22, “In pursuance of Special Orders No 78 from Head Quarters, Department of the Missouri, the name of this Military District will be known as the “District of Cairo”, and will include all the Southern part of Illinois, that part of Kentucky west of the Cumberland River, and the southern counties of Missouri south of Cape Girardeau.

“All troops that are or may be stationed along the bank of the Ohio, on both sides of the River, east of Caledonia and to the mouth of the Cumberland, will be included in the command having Head Quarters at Paducah, Ky.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 331

National Archives, RG 393, USG General Orders

 

“It proves a state of facts that should lead to a full investigation of all the disbursements made at this place”

Dec 22 1861 Wrote Capt. Kelton, “On the 15th I reported that I had directed Capt. Hillyer, Aide de Camp, to proceed to Chicago and investigate charges of fraud made by the Chicago Tribune against the Quartermaster or his Agt. in the purchase of lumber for this command.

“Herewith you will find all the evidence adduced together with Capt. Hillyer’s report.

“It proves a state of facts that in my opinion, should lead to a full investigation of all the disbursements made at this place, from its first establishment as a Military post.  As there has been but little actual cash paid, upon purchases and contracts made here, all overcharges against the Government, might be yet corrected and dishonest agents disappointed in their expected profits.

“I have not arrested Mr. Wilcox, as was my first inclination upon seeing the evidence against him, because I have no place to keep him except the Guardhouse.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 324-5

National Archives, RG 393, USG Hd. Qrs. Correspondence

“Understanding that a heavy trade is being carried on between points North and South, I am desirous of breaking it up.”

Dec 21 1861 Wrote Col. Oglesby, “Understanding that a heavy trade is being carried on between points North of Birds Point and Charleston Mo., and South by means of teams, I am desirous of breaking it up.

“To this end, you will send tomorrow or Monday a sufficient force, say two squadrons of Cavalry under Lt. Col. Prince, to the neighborhood of Belmont with directions to proceed back on the main traveled road, towards Charleston, taking possession of all teams loaded with produce or goods destined for the south and send them back to Birds Point.

“The object of this expedition it is hardly necessary for me to inform you should be kept entirely secret.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 319-20

O.R., I, vii, 453-54

“The fact is I never dreamed of so serious a telegraphic hoax emanating through St. Louis”

Wrote Maj. Gen. Henry Hallack, “Your second dispatch saying ‘It is most extraordinary that you (I) should have obeyed a telegram sent by an unknown person & not even purporting to have been given by authority,’ is received.

“In justice to myself I must reply to this telegram.  In the first place I never thought of doubting the authority of a telegram received from St. Louis, supposing that, in Military matters, the telegraph was under such surveillance that no military order could be passed over the wires that was not by authority;  second, the signature to the telegram was made with so many flourishes that I could not make it out at all, and to send a copy to your Head Quarters was obliged to send to the office here for a duplicate;  third, before this telegraph was received, Capt. Livingston, who came here in charge of these prisoners, reported to me that several who were to come had proven to be imposters, and that he had reason to  believe that two of those still with him were under assumed names;  fourth, directions sufficient to detain prisoners (Camp Jackson exchanged prisoners) might come from the Provost Martial’s office, from Gen. Curtis’ or from Head Quarters, and I do not know the employees of the former, nor the Staff of the latter.

“The fact is I never dreamed of so serious a telegraphic hoax emanating through a large and responsible office like that in St. Louis.  Enclosed I send you a copy of the dispatch received.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 316-7

O.R., II, i, 121

The dispatch received read, “The D.G. Taylor left here at one pm today.  Stop her and send back all the Camp Jackson men.  They all have assumed names.”

“A Gentleman reports that four Infantry regiments and three Gun boats left [Columbus] for New Orleans”

Dec 16 1861 Wrote Capt. Kelton, “A Gentleman of Charleston, Mo., one of the very few Union men there, came up from Columbus last night and reports that four Infantry regiments and three Gun boats left there Saturday night, for New Orleans, where a battle was being fought and the city severely threatened by Federal troops.

“This I think reliable so far as the leaving of troops and Gunboats is concerned.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 294

A footnote to this entry in ‘The Papers’ reads “All the information was wrong.”

“I sent over orders to arrest all officers who had granted passes.”

Dec 14 1861 Wrote Brig. Gen. John McClernand, “On your report to me of the great number of troops that are passing from Birds Point and Fort Holt, I sent over orders to the commanders there to arrest all officers who had granted passes today when their commands were, by order, under Arms.

“This I think will avoid further difficulties.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 284

“From information received this afternoon from Columbus, some movement is taking place from that point.”

Dec 13 1861 Wrote Capt. Kelton, “From information received this afternoon from Columbus, some movement is taking place from that point.  I am inclined to believe that it will be made on Birds Point, possibly at an early hour in the morning.  I am fully prepared for the best defence our means will allow; let it occur where it may.

“Every possible disposition has been made to detect the intention of the enemy.  All the troops at Birds Point, Fort Holt and Cairo are sleeping upon their arms, with Cartridge boxes filled.  Steamers are in readiness to move the Cairo troops to any point at the shortest notice.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 280

O.R., I, vii, 432