I replied, “In regard to the exchange of prisoners I can, of my own accord, make none”

Replied to Gen. Polk, “Yours of this date is just received.  In regard to the exchange of prisoners proposed I can, of my own accord, make none.  I recognize no Southern Confederacy myself but will communicate with higher authority for their views.  Should I not be sustained, I will find means of communicating with you.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol. 3, p 39

O.R., II, i, 511

Oct 14 1861 Received from Confederate Gen. Polk, “I propose an exchange of these prisoners”

Oct 14 1861 Received a message from Confederate Gen. Leonidas Polk, “I have in my camp a number of prisoners of the Federal Army, and am informed there are prisoners belonging to the Missouri State Troops in yours.  I propose an exchange of these prisoners, and for that purpose send Capt Polk of the Artillery and Lieut Smith of the Infantry, both of the Confederate States Army, with a Flag of Truce to deliver to you this communication, and to know your pleasure in regard to my proposal.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 39-40

O.R., II, i, 511

“Dr. Phipps represents that a great deal of Beer is being sold at Birds Point, much to the injury of men in hospital.”

Oct 11 1861 Wrote Col. Wallace, “Dr. Phipps represents that a great deal of Beer is being sold at Birds Point, much to the injury of men in hospital.  You are authorized, and it will meet with my approval, to drive off every man trading with the soldiers or place them under such restrictions as you may deem fit.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3, p 32-3

Oct 9 1861 “Yesterday I visited Cape Girardeau”

Oct 9 1861 Wrote Capt. McKeever, “Yesterday I visited Cape Girardeau and found that Col Plummer was working every available man upon the Fortifications and had really accomplished more in one week than would have been done under an inefficient officer in two months.  At the same rate Cape Girardeau will be very completely fortified by Saturday required however some more heavy ordinance.”

“Information here would indicate that troops are assembling ready to attack Paducah.  My belief is that the attack will not be made for the present however but should it, I will give Genl Smith all the aid prudent.  The fact is when I sent troops to Paducah, I selected the fullest Regiments and those best armed and equipped, leaving here the raw, unarmed and ragged.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant Vol 3, p 30-1

O.R., I, iii, 528-29

Oct 7 1861 “the Confederates have been reinforced at Columbus to about 45,000”

Oct 7 1861 Wrote Capt. McKeever, “Information which I am disposed to look upon as reliable has reached me today that the Confederates have been reinforced at Columbus to about 45,000.  In addition to this they have a large force collected at Union City and are being reinforced every day.  They talk boldly of making an attack upon Paducah by the 15th of this month.  My own impression however is that they are fortifying strongly and preparing to resist a formidable attack and have but little idea of risking anything upon a forward movement.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3, p 24-5

O.R., I, iii 199

Wrote Julia, “he was highly gratified to find that my course had attracted the attention of the President and met with his approval.”

Wrote Julia, “Rawlins has shown me a letter from [Congressman] Washburn, written from Washington City from which it appears that he has been urging me for the place of Major General.  He says he was highly gratified to find that my course had attracted the attention of the President and met with his approval.  I am not a place seeker but will try and sustain myself wherever the authorities that be may place me.  Mr. Washburn has certainly acted very generously towards me and I shall feel ever grateful towards him for it, and want you to lay aside the rule of society which would require Mrs. W. to pay you the first visit and call upon her and make known the many obligations I feel to her husband.  Say that I shall endeavor not to disappoint him.”

“Kiss all the children for me.  A thousand kisses for yourself.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant Vol 3, p 23

“[T]here is a force of one thousand or fifteen hundred of the enemy under command of Col Lowe at Bloomfield”

Oct 6 1861 Wrote Capt. McKeever, “For the last two days I have had no realiable intelligence of the movements of the enemy. — The gun boats have been out of order so as to be unable to make reconnaissances, and one of my spies from whom I expected a full and accurate report has not returned.  —  Our scouts report nothing of importance.  I have ordered a force of twelve hundred men to Charleston.  They will leave early in the morning.  My own opinion is that the enemy have no present intention of moving on Cape Girardeau.  I think Paducah is more likely the point they design to approach.  I have ordered one Gun boat to cruise down as far as Norfolk to night, and will send the other gun boat (now at Mound City repairing) to reconnoiter further down tomorrow morning.  We are very much in need of the new gun boat promised and I trust she will be here very soon.  I expect to go to Cape Girardeau tomorrow night to inspect the troops there and the condition of the post.”

“Since writing the above I have received a report from Col Plummer commanding at Cape Girardeau, informing me that there is a force of one thousand or fifteen hundred of the enemy under command of Col Lowe at Bloomfield, and that preparations are making at Benton to receive the enemy.  I heard of this force of Lowe’s and instructed him to send out scouts and ascertain his whereabouts.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant Vol 3, p 19

Oct 4 1861″My impression is there is no concerted plan to attack this place, Cape Girardeau or Paducah for the present.”

Oct 4 1861 Wrote Capt. McKeever, “I have nothing reliable from the enemy further than that Jeff. Thompson has broken up his encampment at Belmont and gone to New Madrid.  No doubt it is with the view of going North from there but whether any other force goes with him I have no positive information.  My impression is there is no concerted plan to attack this place, Cape Girardeau or Paducah for the present. — When I first learned that Thompson had broken up his Camp I ordered out a force to Charleston to cut him off in that direction.  I enclose you the report of Col. Oglesby who made the detail for the expedition.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant Vol 3, p 16-7

O.R., I, iii, 519-520

Oct 2 1861 Wrote Julia, “The amount of suffering the coming winter must be horrible.”

Wrote Julia, “What do you say to Fred. making the campaign with me? —  I have not news for you.  What I am doing I do not believe in writing about, in fact it is prohibited.  There is one thing however I can tell you.  Columbus twenty miles below here has been reinfoced 10,000 men within the last few days.  Among the officers below here are several of my old acquaintances.  McCown, who left his Ambulanch and mules with me you recollect, commands a Brigade.  Bowen, Mit Kennerly’s husband commands a regiment.  Then there is Gen. Johnson, Gen. Hardee and one or two other old army officers to say nothing of the great Gen. Pillow. —  Dr. Sharp hears from Nelly every few days.  Her and children are well.  I have not heard from Emma lately. —  I think you certainly do not receive all my letters for there are some of them I think you would notice the receipt of specially.”

“Yesterday I went up to Paducah.  It is a beautiful town but now nearly deserted.  This end of Ky will soon be in the same fix Mo. is in, a waste.  The amount of suffering the coming winter must be horrible.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 10-11