Oct 27 1861 Received report from Col. Plummer of a victory over Confederate Gen. Jeff Thompson

Oct 27 1861 Received report from Col. Joseph Plummer, commanding at Cape Girardeau. “Pursuant to your order of the 16th, I left this Post on the 18th inst with about fifteen hundred men and marched upon Fredricktown, via Jackson and Dallis, where I arrived at 12 O’Clock on Monday the 21st.  Finding there Col Carlin with about three thousand men who had arrived at 9 O’Clock that morning.  He gave me a portion of his command which I united with my own and immediately started in pursuit of Thompson, who was reported to have evacuated the town the day before and retreated towards Greenville.  I found him however occupying a position about one mile out of town on the Greenville road which he had held since about 9 O’Clock AM and immediately attacked him.  The battle lasted about two and one half hours, and resulted in the total defeat of Thompson, and rout of all his forces, consisting of about three thousand five hundred men.  Their loss was severe, ours very light.  Among their killed was Lowe.  On the following day I pursued Thompson twenty two miles towards Greenville for the purpose of capturing his train, but finding further pursuit useless, and believing Pilot Knob secure and the object of the expedition accomplished, I returned to this post, where I arrived last evening, having been absent seven days and a half.  I brought with me forty two prisoners, and one iron twelve pound field piece, a number of small arms and horses taken upon the field.  I will forward a detailed report of the battle, as soon as reports from Colonels of Regiments and Commanding Officers of Corps are received.”

The papers of Ulysses S Grant Vol 3 p 80

O.R., I, iii, 209

Wrote Mary, “As to the needlessness of the movements of troops I am a better judge than the news reporters who write about it.”

Oct 26 1861 Wrote my sister Mary, “I have gone longer this time without writing to you than I intended and have no good excuse for it.  I have rec’d two letters, at least, from you and father since my last one of which wanted special answer.  As I have not got that letter before me I may fail to answer some points.  As to my not taking Columbus there are several reasons for it which I understand perfectly and could make plain to anyone else but do not fell disposed to commit the reasons to paper.  As to the needlessness of the movements of troops I am a better judge than the news reporters who write about it.  My whole administration of affairs seems to have given entire satisfaction to those who have the right to judge and should have the ability to judge correctly.  I find by a little absence for the last few days (under orders) that my whole course has received marked approbation from citizens and soldiers, so much so that many who are comparative strangers to me are already claiming for me promotion.  This is highly gratifying, but I do not think any promotions should be made for the present.  Let service tell who are the deserving ones and give them the promotion.”

“I send you, with this, likeness of myself and staff.  No 1 you will have no difficulty in recognizing.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant Vol 3, p 75-7

USGrant01

Oct 25 1861 “My mission to Springfield was only partially successful.”

Oct 25 1861 Wrote Capt. McKeever “I have the honor to report my return to this command last evening.  You have no doubt received the report of Gen. McClernand as to the result of a Flag of Truce sent to Columbus during my absence. — I have nothing new to add.”

“My mission to Springfield was only partially successful.  The Governor has neither Artillery nor small arms at present at his disposal but if my command, or this command, is not supplied when he does receive them, one company will be equipped with a battery of James’ rifled cannon.  This cannot be before the last of November.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant Vol 3, p 70

O.R., I, iii, 556

Oct 20 1861 Wrote Julia, “What I want is to advance.”

Oct 20 1861 Wrote Julia, “I was in hopes I should have my Photograph to send by this time, but the frame is not yet made.  I will also send you several copies, not in frame, one of them for Lank.  I sent you $50.00 to pay Dentist bill and your rent.”

“We are all quiet here though how long we shall remain so is hard to tell.  There is a very large force at Columbus compared to ours. –  I am very sorry that I have not got a force to go south with, at least to Columbus, but the fates seem to be against any such thing.  My forces are scattered and occupy posts that must be held.  I will not write however what I intended.  It will not interest you only that it would be a defense for my not being in Columbus today instead of where I am, but would be very improper for the public to know particularly at this time when a publication of it would show our weakness to the enemy.  There is but very little doubt, no doubt, but that we can hold this place.  What I want is to advance.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3, p 63-4

Oct 18 1861 “The same Agt. reports that Jeff. Thompson went North to join his force with Lowe’s and attack Ironton.”

Oct 18 1861 Wrote Capt McKeever, “By a secret Agt. sent by me to Columbus and New Madrid I have confirmation of the report that Hardee, with about 5000 men, has joined Buckner.  The same Agt. reports that Jeff. Thompson went North to join his force with Lowe’s and attack Ironton. — At Columbus a new Casemat Battery has been erected, a new 84 pound rifled gun brought to the upper end of the city, and a chain brought up to throw across the river to obstruct navigation.  In view of these facts I ordered a reconnaissance with Gun b oat today.  Enclosed I send you the report of the commander.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3, p 54-5

O.R., I, iii, 248

Oct 16 1861 “Received a dispatch from Gen. Sherman stating that Hardee had effected a junction with Buckner and they were threatening Louisville”

Oct 16 1861 Wrote Capt. McKeever, “Two dispatches from Gen. Frémont were received today and promptly attended to.  I also received a dispatch from Gen. Sherman stating that Hardee had effected a junction with Buckner and they were threatening Louisville; requesting me at the same time, in connection with Gen. Smith, to make a demonstration on Columbus.  Sending troops to Cape Girardeau as I have done today and having out another expedition of some ten hundred men, it will be a day or two before any move could be made.  I will communicate with Gen. Smith and cooperate in any demonstration that may seem to recommend itself.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3, p 42

O.R., I, iii, 536

Oct 15 1861 Ordered reconnaisance made toward Chester Illinois

Oct 15 1861 Wrote Gen. McClernand, “Information deemed reliable having been received at these headquarters that a large body of troops supposed to be the Rebel Forces are encamped on the Mississippi River immediately opposite Chester [midway between Cape Girardeau and St. Louis].  You will therefore order the Gun Boat Tyler and Steamer Alex Scott with a Regiment of Infantry with sufficient number of days rations to proceed up the Mississippi River as far as Chester Illinois for the purpose of making reconnaissance.  Should the information prove correct, they will dislodge them from their position.”

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 3 p 41-2

O.R., I, iii, 534