Stanton: “Governor Brown, of Georgia, was arrested for attempting to restore the rebellion”

Sec. Stanton sent me the following message.

Governor Brown, of Georgia, was arrested for attempting to restore the rebellion by calling together an unauthorized assemblage, assuming to act as the Legislature of Georgia, without permission of the President—This I understand to have been subsequent to his alleged surrender. I am not advised of the terms of the surrender, or under what authority he can claim any benefit arising from it. If you have any details or report upon that point, I will thank you to send them to me.

I replied,

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The inclosed makes it appear that Brown, of Georgia, surrendered the militia of that State and himself as commander in-chief thereof to General Wilson and was paroled.  If the call for the meeting of the Georgia Legislature was subsequent to his parole, I suppose there can be no doubt but that he stands liable to arrest for violation of his parole. Otherwise, is it not obligatory upon the Government to observe their part of the contract? I would not advise authorizing him to go back to Georgia now under any circumstances, but I do not think a paroled officer is subject to arrest so long as he observes his parole without giving him notice first that he is absolved from further observance of it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 69

O.R., I, xlix, part 2, p 836

“If I feel sufficiently well to travel I will go to Washington”

I have been visiting my family in Philadelphia, and have fallen ill.  I am sorely needed in Washington, though.  I wrote Rawlins,

PHILADELPHIA, May 15, 1865.

General J. A. RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff:

Please have two rooms secured for me at the hotel. If I feel sufficiently well to travel I will go to Washington (Mrs. Grant with me) to-morrow. I am now too unwell to sit up any length of time, and cannot tell when I shall be better. Knowing the almost absolute necessity for my presence in Washington worries me very much.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 40

O.R., I, xlvi, part 3, p 1152

Wilson: “Colonel Pritchard, commanding Fourth Michigan Cavalry, captured Jeff. Davis and family”

Jeff Davis has finally been captured.  I received a copy of the following telegram sent by Gen. Wilson to Sec. Stanton.

MACON, GA., May 12, 1865 – 11 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have the honor to report that at daylight of the 10th instant Colonel Pritchard, commanding Fourth Michigan Cavalry, captured Jeff. Davis and family; Reagan, Postmaster-General; Colonel Harrison, private secretary; Colonel Johnston, aide-de-camp; Colonel Morris, Colonel Lubbock, Lieutenant Hathaway, and others. Colonel Pritchard surprised their camp at Irwinville, in Irwin County, Ga., seventy-five miles southeast of this place. The prisoners will be here to-morrow night, and will be forwarded under strong guard without delay. I will send further particulars at once.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 29

O.R., I, xlix, part 2, p 733-4

“I know of no order which changes your command in any particular”

I wrote Sherman,

WASHINGTON, May 9, 1865-1. 30 p. m.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Fort Monroe, Va.:

Your dispatch of yesterday received. I know of no order which changes your command in any particular. General Wilson is in telegraphic communication with Washington whilst you have not been; consequently instructions have been sent him direct.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 27

O.R., I, xlvii, part 3, p 445

Sherman: “If I have proven incompetent to manage my own command let me know it”

I received the following two dispatches from Gen. Sherman sent yesterday.

FORT MONROE, VA., May 8, 1865.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT, Washington:

Am just arrived. All well with Schofield. Expect to reach City Point to-morrow and receive my orders from you. Did you get my dispatch from Morehead City? Am informed that General Slocum will march from Richmond on the 10th. I expect to join and march with the Right Wing, with which my horses are.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General

 

FORT MONROE, VA., May 8, 1865-12 midnight.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT, Washington;

I have full dispatches from Wilson of the 6th. One boat has arrived at Augusta all right. He is after Jeff. Davis, who cannot escape save in disguise. He is reported in Georgia, escorted by about seventy officers as a special body guard and about 3,000 cavalry . Does the Secretary of War’s newspaper order take Wilson from my command or shall I continue to order him? If I have proven incompetent to manage my own command let me know it.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 27

O.R., I, xlvii, part 3, p 434

“I find a great deal to do here and will yet for a few weeks”

I wrote Julia,

May 7th 1865

Dear Julia,
I did not write yesterday but telegraphed twice which answered every purpose, particularly as I had nothing to write. I find a great deal to do here and will yet for a few weeks. I will probably be back on Wednesday or Thursday next taking Bowers with me. I think on that occasion I shall run over to West Point for one day. I want to see all my old professors again and as they are always absent from about the 20th of June until the 1st of Sept. I will not have an opportunity of doing so at the time I propose taking you and the children there.
Love and kisses for you and the children.
Ulys.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 24

Sherman: “Have you any reason why I should longer submit to the insult contained in Halleck’s dispatch?”

I received the following from Gen. Sherman,

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C., May 4, 1865-9 p. m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Washington:

Just arrived from Savannah. All well in that quarter. Sent two boats with stores for Wilson up to Augusta. Gillmore will occupy Augusta and Orangeburg. The to brigades from here have sailed for Savannah. Have you any reason why I should longer submit to the insult contained in Halleck’s dispatch in the New York papers of the 28th? I will go to City Point in a few days. Answer me there.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

I replied,

WASHINGTON, May 6, 1865.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi:

Your letters to Rawlins and myself written but the day after army departure from Raleigh have but just reached [me]. I answered them immediately, but concluded not to mail to Petersburg thinking it doubtful whether, now that it is so late, it would reach you before you would be starting back. I will not furnish copies of your letters to the Secretary of War and ask the publication of them until I see you. I do not know how to answer your dispatch asking whether you should submit to Halleck’s insult contained in a dispatch published in the New York Herald of the 28th. I never saw that dispatch except as published in the papers. I question whether it was not an answer, in Halleck’s style, to directions from the Secretary of War, giving him instructions to do as he did. I do not know this to be the case, although I have spoken to Mr. Stanton on the subject. Your correspondence with Johnston has not yet been published. I have been absent from the city four or five days, and returning to-day and finding this to be the case, I requested its publication. It is promised for to-morrow. Although I did not agree with your in the advisability of adopting your agreement with Johnston of the 18th of April, yet it made no change in my estimate of the services you have rendered, or of the services you can still render, and will on all proper occasions. I know very well it is a difference of opinion which time alone will decide who was right.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 12, 16-17

O.R., I, xlvii, part 3, p 387-8, 410

“There is no use attempting to rebuild the road to Atlanta.”

I received a telegram from Gen. Thomas in Nashville.

 

Nashville, May 4, 1865-10 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Do you think it advisable to repair the railroad to Atlanta? It may prove useful in holding control over the country.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

It is my sincere hope that we will not need to maintain a large body of troops to maintain order in the South.  I wrote him,

PHILADELPHIA, May 5, 1865-3 p.m.

Major General G. H. THOMAS,

Nashville, Tenn.:

There is no use attempting to rebuild the road to Atlanta. A much cheaper and easier way for supplying the country where General Wilson is can be found from the sea-coast. It may not be necessary for us to keep troops in the interior.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 10

O.R., I, xlix, part 2, p 597,613

“I wish you would have efforts made to arrest … particularly obnoxious political leaders in the State”

I received the following from Gen. Halleck,

RICHMOND, VA., May 4, 1865-1 p.m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT:

General Meade has arrived here, and the Second and Fifth Corps will probably start from Manchester to-morrow. A squadron of cavalry sent to Lynchburg reports that city is held by about a thousand of Mosby’s guerrillas, and that parties are conscripting horses and arms in the country under orders of Governor Smith. I have directed Sheridan to send out a brigade of cavalry to capture them if possible, and bring them in. Wheaton’s division of Sixth Corps has been ordered from Danville back to Burkeville. I propose soon to issue an order that all armed men in Virginia who do not surrender by a certain date shall be held as outlaws and robbers.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

I wrote back,

PHILADELPHIA, May 4, 1865-12 midnight.

Major-General HALLECK,

Richmond, Va.:

I gave General Hancock several days ago verbal instructions to treat all men in arms in Virginia as you propose to notify them you will do. I wish you would have efforts made to arrest Smith, Hunter, Letcher, and all other particularly obnoxious political leaders in the State. I would advise offering a reward of $5,000 for Mosby, if he is still in the State.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 15, p 6-7

O.R., I, xlvi, part 3, p 1081-2

“Every effort should now be made to induce all armed bands of men … to come in and surrender”

I wrote Gen. Thomas,

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 30, 1865-1 p.m.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Commanding Department of the Cumberland:

Every effort should now be made to induce all armed bands of men in Tennessee, Alabama, and every where in each of your commands to come in and surrender their arms on the terms made by Lee and Johnston. Send out under flag of truce a summons to all bands you know of and report here the course you pursue. Make every effort to obtain intelligence of Jeff. Davis’ movements in the South, and spare no pains in setting an expedition on foot to catch him if he should be heard from.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General, U. S. Army.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 14, p 441

O.R., I, xlix, part 2, p 522