Beauregard: “TO THE PEOPLE OF GEORGIA: Arise for the defense of your native coast!”

Sherman’s march is apparently causing great consternation in Georgia.  I received a copy of a public proclamation by Gen. Beauregard and passed it along to Gen. Thomas in Tennessee.

CITY POINT, November 24, 1864-4 p.m.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Nashville:

Following proclamation of Beauregard just taken from Savannah papers of 21st. Do not let Forrest get off without punishment.

 

CORINTH, November 18.

(Via Selma.)

TO THE PEOPLE OF GEORGIA:

Arise for the defense of your native coast! Rally around your gallant soldiers! Obstruct and destroy the roads in Sherman’s front, flanks, and rear, and his army will soon starve in your midst! Be confident and resolute! Trust in our overruling Providence, and success will crown your efforts. I hasten to join you in defense of your homes and firesides.

 

BEAUREGARD.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 13, p 23-4

O.R., I, xlv,  part 1, p 1014

“So many persons are calling to see me that I can not get out”

I have employed a Mr. William Bergholz, a civil engineer from South Carolina, as an agent to obtain information in the heartland of the Confederacy. His wife Mary has informed me he has had the misfortune to be arrested by U.S. troops. I have ordered his release and wrote her,

New-York, Nov. 20th 1864
Mrs. May M. Bergholz,
I have just learned from Gen. Dix that your husband has been released and sent to City Point to see me. I at once telegraphed to the Provost Marshal at Baltim[ore] to stop him if it was not to late and to say to him that I would be in Washington on Tuesday.  I fear however my dispatch will reach Baltimore too late to intercept him.
I arrived here with my family last night. Will remain until 2
P. M. to-morrow. So many persons are calling to see me that I can not get out. If you will call at the Astor House, Parlor and send your name to my room I will be glad to see you. Gen. Dix was not aware of the arrest of your husband until he received my letter. Do you not see now that I have been able to befriend you? It afforded me great pleasure though I was sorry you should need friendly aid. I am satisfied there was no reason why Mr. B. should be arrested.
Yours Truly
U. S. Grant

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 13, p 15

“It is reported from Richmond that Early has been recalled from the Valley”

I am presently visiting my family in Burlington, NJ.  However, I have received reports that Confederate Gen. Early’s troops have been recalled from the Shenandoah Valley to Richmond.  If that is the case, Gen. Sheridan’s troops can be returned to the Army of the Potomac.  I wrote him,

BURLINGTON, N. J., November 19, 1864-9 a. m.

Major-General SHERIDAN,

Newtown, Va.:

It is reported from Richmond that Early has been recalled from the Valley. If you are satisfied this is so send the Sixth Corps to City Point without delay. If your cavalry can cut the Virginia Central road now is the time to do it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 13, p 6

O.R., I, xliii, part 2, p 645

“Should this occur it will become our duty to follow”

With Gen. Sherman making his movement from Atlanta to the sea, we must be alert for any weakening of Lee’s position to take advantage. I wrote Gen. Meade,

CITY POINT, VA., November 15, 1864.

Major General G. G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

The movements now being made by the army under General Sherman may cause General Lee to detach largely from the force defending Richmond to meet him. Should this occur it will become our duty to follow. In such case the Army of the James will be promptly withdrawn from north of James River and put in the trenches about Petersburg, thus liberating all of your infantry and cavalry and a sufficient amount of artillery. To prepare for such emergency, therefore, I would direct that you hold yourself in readiness to start in the shortest time with twelve days’ rations, six being carried on the person, and forty rounds of ammunition in wagons. Select from your command the best batteries to accompany you, not exceeding one gun to 1,000 men. It is not intended that these preparations shall be made to start at a moment’s notice, but that the articles shall be where they can be reached and loaded, and all preparation made for starting by the time your troops can be relieved by the troops of General Butler after such movement on the part of the enemy is discovered. A copy of this will be forwarded General Butler, with instructions to carry out his part promptly, moving night as well as day, if the contingency should arise.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 423

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 620

“I want to run up home for a day or two”

Since it looks as if there will be a pause in the campaign against Richmond, I would like to take a few days to visit my family in Philadelphia.  I wrote Sec. Stanton,

CITY POINT, VA.,

November 13, 1864-8.30 a. m.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

As soon as troops begin to arrive here rapidly so as to insure against offensive operations on the part of the enemy, I want to run up home for a day or two. I can go and return before troops enough will have arrived for me to take the offensive. I would not if I could just now do anything to force the enemy out of Richmond or Petersburg. It would liberate too much of a force to oppose Sherman with.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 413

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 612

“I think I will send them to the Dry Tortugas for duty without commands for a while”

I replied to Sec. Stanton’s message concerning information about Gen. Sherman’s movements being reported in the press.

CITY POINT, VA., November 12, 1864.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The publication referred to in my dispatch seemed to originate in an Indianapolis paper on the authority of army officers direct from Chattanooga. I will send a staff officer WEST in the morning to ascertain who those officers are, and order them here. I think I will send them to the Dry Tortugas for duty without commands for a while, as a warning to the others that they are not to report military movements in advance of their being made.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 410-1

O.R., I, xxxix, part 3, p 749

“The Times lays out Sherman’s programme exactly and gives his strength”

Today’s copy of the New York Times has laid out the plans of Gen. Sherman in minute detail.  This information will prove to be of great use to the enemy.  I wrote to Sec. Stanton,

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

All the Northern papers of 10th, and especially the New York Times, contain the most contraband news I have seen published during the war. The Times lays out Sherman’s programme exactly and gives his strength. It is impossible to keep these papers from reaching the enemy, and no doubt by to-morrow they will be making the best arrangements they can to meet this move.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

He replied,

WAR DEPARTMENT, November 11, 1864-9. 30 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I have seen with indignation the newspaper articles referred to, and others of like kind, but they come from Sherman’s army, and generally from his own officers, and there is reason to believe he has not been very guarded in his own talk. I saw to-day, in a paymaster’s letter to another officer, his plans as stated by himself. Yesterday I was told full details given by a member of his staff to a friend in Washington. Matters not spoken of aloud in the Department are bruited by officers coming from Sherman’s army in every Western printing office and street. If he cannot keep from telling his plans to paymasters, and his staff are permitted to send them broadcast over the land, the Department cannot prevent their publication.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 403-4

O.R., I, xxxix, part 3, p 740

“Congratulate the President for me for the double victory”

From the news reports coming in, President Lincoln has been re-elected.  No greater blow could have been struck against the Confederate’s hopes.  I wrote to Sec. Stanton,

CITY POINT, November 10, 1864-10.30 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

Enough now seems to be known to say who is to hold the reins of Government for the next four years. Congratulate the President for me for the double victory. The election having passed of quietly, no bloodshed or riot throughout the land, is a victory worth more to the country than a battle won. Rebeldom and Europe will so construe it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

 

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 398

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 581

 

“I would rather you would spend Christmas Holidays with me however and bring all the children”

I wrote Julia,

City Point, Va, Nov. 9th 1864. Dear Julia,
I wrote to Mr. Morris telling him that I expected to be in Burlington next Sunday to spend the day. At that time I expected to go to Washington, where all my records are kept, to remain a few days to write my report for Congress. The campaign not being ended I asked the Sec. of War to let me off and he has consented. I will not therefore be home at the time designated.
I have received but one letter from you since you left N. J. Did you meet Gen. Rawlins in St. Louis? He was to have gone out to see you and as he returned about the time your letter announced you would I supposed you would come in company with him.
The election has passed off quietly, I understand, and I hope the choice of the people will be quietly submitted to. If there was less clamor and dissenting in the North the rebellion would be much sooner put down. The hopes of the South are constantly fed by the sayings of our Northern people.
Love and kisses for you & the children. Gen. Rawlins expects to stay about four days in New York City and then return here. If you wish to come and spend a week at that time do so. Bring Jess with you if you come. I would rather you would spend Christmas Holidays with me however and bring all the children. Love and kisses again.
Ulys.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 397-8

“The following official statement of the vote polled in the Army of the Potomac yesterday has just been received”

I have received the official returns for the Presidential election from the men in the Army of the Potomac.  There is a substantial majority for President Lincoln. I sent them to Sec. Stanton.

CITY POINT, November 9, 1864.

Honorable R. M. STANTON:

The following official statement of the vote polled in the Army of the Potomac yesterday has just been received from General Meade: Maine, total vote, 1,677; Lincoln’s majority, 1,143. New Hampshire, 515; Lincoln majority, 279. Vermont, 102; Lincoln’s majority, 42. Rhode Island, 190; Lincoln’s majority, 134. Pennsylvania (seven counties to hear from), 11,122; Lincoln’s majority, 3,494. West Virginia, 82; Lincoln’s majority, 70. Ohio, 684; Lincoln’s majority 306. Wisconsin, 1,065; Lincoln’s majority, 633. Michigan, 1,917; Lincoln’s majority, 745. Maryland, 1,428; Lincoln’s majority, 89. New York, 305; Lincoln’s majority,113.

Majority for Lincoln, 8,208.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

The Papers of Ulysses S Grant, Vol 12, p 395-6

O.R., I, xlii, part 3, p 570